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Salutations™!!

It is a long train of thought that got me to this, so bear with me for a bit.

In watching the awesome Disney+ service, I’m watching the “True Life Adventures” from the 1950s and 1960s. I’m watching Jungle Cat (1960) right now and it’s focusing on the part where they are featuring the jaguar. I noticed at the same time that the announcement of Luke Kuechly’s retirement from the Carolina Panthers.

1024px-Jaguar_in_Pantanal_Brazil_1_(cropped)

©Brad van Dorp

That got me thinking. The Panthers and the Jacksonville Jaguars started playing in the NFL the same year, 1995. Both “big cats.”

So, I got to thinking, who would win in a real fight, the panther or the jaguar? So, I did a little research. I don’t know who much of this is actually factual, but what I did find, was interesting.

Both cats are of the Animalia kingdom. Both are of the Felidae family. Both are of the Panthera genus. Both are of the Carnivora order. The average head and body length of both cats are 43″ to 75″. The average weight of both is 79 to 350 lbs. They both exert the same force, have the same technique, stamina and intelligence. The average life span of the panther is 13-15 years and the average life span of the jaguar is 14 years.

So, basically, they are the same exact animal. A few of the sites I looked at say that pathers are basically just melanistic jaguars. Panther is also kind of generic for leopards and jaguars, but with black coloring. So, again, they’re the same animal.

The natural area for the panther is Asia, Africa (leopard) and America (jaguar), and I suppose that’s North and South. The area for jaguars is Central and South America. So, the color of the skin/coat and area seem to really be the only differences.

So, does that mean that both teams are the same? Nah, but I do find it interesting. So, that meant nothing but I thought why not share it?

Until tomorrow, same blog channel…
Scorp out!


“As written and directed by James Algar, this is one of Mr. Disney’s best—intimate, tasteful, strong and matter-of-fact.” – Howard Thompson of the New York Times about Disney’s Jungle Cat.